Sinus Precautions

The roots of upper premolars and molars often overlap or even project into the maxillary sinus cavity.  Usually, there is a small amount of bone between the roots and the sinus, but not always.  Sometimes when these teeth are removed it is unavoidable to have a hole into the sinus.  If this is noted at surgery, your doctor will make an assessment of the situation and may choose to perform an immediate repair.  Regardless of the treatment chosen, it will be of the utmost importance to follow these instructions.  Patients who follow instructions should heal just fine.  There is no better time to heal a sinus communication than after the initial procedure when it occured.  While persistent sinus communications can be repaired, it is well known to be a more involved and difficult procedure and sometimes requires multiple surgeries before success is achieved.

  • Absolutely, DO NOT test the repair by attempting to see if you can push air between your mouth and nose.  Doing so will keep the area from healing.
  • Do not blow your nose for at least two weeks, maybe longer if your doctor requests.  You may wipe your nose, but do not blow.
  • Try not to sneeze, but if you must sneeze, do so with your mouth open.  A closed mouth sneeze will build up too much pressure in the sinus.
  • DO NOT SMOKE! 
  • Do not use straws.
  • Do not spit forcefully or rinse vigorously.  Gentle salt water rinses may be use as described in other sections.
  • Do not chew on the area.
  • Your doctor will have provided a prescription for antibiotics.  It is important to take these as directed.  Contact the office if you have a reaction or multiple unformed (watery) bowel movements.
  • You should keep your sinus from becoming congested.  Use an over-the-counter decongestant such as Sudafed, as needed to maintain a clear sinus.
  • Slight bleeding from the nose is possible for several days following surgery.